[Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain Books ] Free Download as DOC ↠ James Bloodworth


  • Paperback
  • 288
  • Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain
  • James Bloodworth
  • English
  • 14 December 2017
  • 9781786490148

10 thoughts on “Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain

  1. says:

    I pay my cleaner £10 an hour at the same time as I pay my lawyer £570 an hour Is my lawyer worth 57 times what my cleaner is worth? It must be to me or I would not pay it That is the free market in action James Bloodworth is aware of these discrepancies He does not like them but he is not proposing a solution In his well

  2. says:

    The Guardian is publishing a series of anonymous reports from a worker inside an fulfillment center Our new column from inside 'They treat us as disposable'A podcast interview with the author about this work can be found here at Intelligence SuaredI read this book because I wanted to know what it was like to be an Uber driver and t

  3. says:

    I work in the Employability Sector and have done so for 15 years Several employers ago my Team had successfully placed ten of our customers as new employees with TK Maxx a major clothing and housewares retailer in the UK We were pretty surprised not to mention confused when they came back to our office with news of their new job

  4. says:

    James Bloodworth an English sometime Trotskyite has written a book which combines the television series Undercover Boss and George Orwell’s

  5. says:

    Hired will be praised as an unflinching look at modern Britain That should give grave offence to modern Britain Although the book is a documentary it spreads out like an Hieronymus Bosch except that Bloodworth

  6. says:

    Rather like a modern version of Orwell's Road to Wigan Pier Bloodworth's book describes six months 'undercover in low wage

  7. says:

    A well researched highly self aware and accessible insight into the state of Britain’s in work poverty with a healthy examination

  8. says:

    45An important book looking at low paid insecure work in the UK which seems to be part of the trend not just in Britain but around the world Bloodworth took jobs in an warehouse sorry fulfilment centre with care services assisting the elderly in a call centre in Wales and as an UBER driver in London so that he could experience at first hand the conditions he's writing about; and he talked to other workers in s

  9. says:

    Interesting look in to British 'gig' economy reminded me Down and Out in Paris and London and Nickel and Dimed On Not Getting by in America

  10. says:

    An unflinching investigation of the exploitation of underpaid workers in the UK This book is revealing and shocking yet slightly voyeuristic at times The book uncovers heartbreaking accounts from low wage workers and each are a damning indictment of the industries Bloodworth explores Although this book is insightful I don’t think it is as powerful as other investigative books

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James Bloodworth Ü 8 characters

Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain

Working across Britain taking on the country's worst jobs He lives on the meagre proceeds and discovers the anxieties and hopes of those he encounters including working class British young students striving to make ends meet and Eastern European immigrantsReminiscent of Orwell's Road to Wigan Pier this is a fascinating window onto a world that Britain's London centric media rarely visits From the Staffordshire warehouse to the taxi c. Hired will be praised as an unflinching look at modern Britain That should give grave offence to modern Britain Although the book is a documentary it spreads out like an Hieronymus Bosch except that Bloodworth s figures are made of flesh and blood and Hell is the bottom end of the British workforce The book is his account of six months minimum wage work often in reality lower and what he did in the towns that rarely interest governments or the media We start in the warehouse in Rugeley Staffordshire also my home town It stands incongruous in the countryside which seems an odd term for a building dwarfed by three cooling towers flanked by two industrial estates and a few minutes walk from the town dump Working as an order picker he walks the euivalent of ten miles daily inside a building the size of ten football pitches Three supervisors are on hand to bellow at each worker who returns even thirty seconds late Each worker carries a handheld device to track their every move like lags in some high tech prison The devices spits out a torrent of instructions sent by a distant line manager It is easy he says to imagine a future where human beings are wired up to similar machines twenty four hours a day Set aside to the inhumanity of the machinery is the inhumanity of the human staff All the pickers are placed via agencies many are lured from Eastern Europe with promises of working in John Lewis s in the city All contracts are zero hours Documents are proffered for signature before being whisked away with a swiftness to impress a cheetah One agency member thankfully sacked in 2013 repeatedly bragged about the joys of stopping the suckers benefits for 13 weeksBefore long he applies for work as a Carer in Blackpool Applies is the key word since the job reuires a DBS check before he can actually start working Due to cuts in police staff the processing speed can last months after an interview long after the job has been filled by someone else Care agencies do not recognise unions staff turnover is high Each carer is expected to spend a minimum of twenty minutes per person a target freuently impossible with the infirm and the elderly With care farmed out to contractors the number of clients packed into the working day trumps petty concerns like uality or dignity Errors or outright omissions in medication records are rife especially among staff with poor English skills Accidental overdoses or poisoning is not unheard of Many of the people needing care have no relatives or friends in driving distance The warning embedded in these scenes cannot be ignored Britain s ageing population co exists with a younger population that works some of the longest hours in Europe Britain s population is living longer than ever before one person in three born after 2013 will live to be a hundred Based on our present attitudes to care it seems likely this will be the fate awaiting most BritonsBloodworth shares Orwell s knack for discerning truth from the way other people lie He notes how socialist realism has mutated into the fake cheeriness of corporate PR You may slave for 29 a day but your CEO with a net value of 60 billion is an associate People are released rather than sacked a warehouse is a fulfilment centre Call centres abound with half witted slogans and company mandated fun group activities the songs had a definite whiff of the ode to the tyrant He notes how the contrived wackiness exposes low wages and apathy ruthlessly rather than disguise itPerhaps the worst abuser is the taxi firm Uber On the surface all seems well At the tap of a button a driver is summoned no matter the hour and often cheaper than a traditional cab Drivers work flexible hours paid at a piece rate delivered by apps The name for this burgeoning sector the gig economy evokes images of rock stars rolling out of bed late turning up for work whenever the whim takes you It seems effective The number of self employed Britons rose to a record high of 47 million in 2016 fuelled in no small part by the gig economy Some cite this as the triumph of the entrepreneur Bloodworth sees this as a mirage by legally deeming its drivers independent contractors not employees the company has no obligation to pay the minimum wage basic sick pay or pay any significant taxes on profits Drivers who refuse even two reuests from the Uber app in a row can be barred for life and failure to maintain high ratings by customers whether they re drunk difficult psychopathic or worse Londoners results in less work Work is allocated by an algorithm with no warning of the journey s length in advance Bloodworth is not nostalgic and demands that we reject received notions about work Tedious though a call centre may be no one perishes in an explosion or a collapse at an office He finds it odd how when decrying the trampling of English culture small towners target the solitary Polish aisle in the supermarket not the identikit chain stores and fast food outlets Ronald McDonald he says deserves blame than foreign fruit pickers He deplores how progressives romanticise East Europeans but damn the English working class as incorrigibly racist and idle A sugar tax will not make the nation healthier it will make the poorly paid poorer still because when your work and income is irregular so is your diet Foodies and pontificating celebrities like Jamie Oliver fill him with outrageBloodworth lacks the finesse of a John McPhee and he has the bad habit of uoting people who spell out exactly what he has just been thinking Sometimes his people are faintly drawn mere springboards for factoids Some readers may be frightened off by his truth telling But that is the sincerest compliment one pays this born writer and his restless scorching intelligence

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Abs of Uber Bloodworth uncovers horrifying employment practices and shows how traditional working class communities have been decimated by the move to soulless service jobs with no security advancement or satisfaction But this is than an exposé of unscrupulous employers; this is a gripping examination of post Brexit Britain a divided nation which needs to understand the true reality of how other people live and work before it can he. 45An important book looking at low paid insecure work in the UK which seems to be part of the trend not just in Britain but around the world Bloodworth took jobs in an warehouse sorry fulfilment centre with care services assisting the elderly in a call centre in Wales and as an UBER driver in London so that he could experience at first hand the conditions he s writing about and he talked to other workers in same and similar jobs and ordinary folks living in the depressed towns he visited What emerges is a disturbing portrait

characters Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain

A compelling and ground breaking piece of narrative journalism that gets right to the heart of divided Britain and its dysfunctional jobs climateWe all define ourselves by our profession at least to some extent But what if our job was demeaning poorly paid and tedious Cracking open Britain's divisions immigrantBritish NorthSouth urbanrural working classmiddle class leaveremain journalist James Bloodworth spends six months living and. The Guardian is publishing a series of anonymous reports from a worker inside an fulfillment center Our new column from inside They treat us as disposable A podcast interview with the author about this work can be found here at Intelligence SuaredI read this book because I wanted to know what it was like to be an Uber driver and thanks to this honest and well written account of working in low wage Britain I got my answer not great but not so bad and certainly far better than working at an Warehouse A read of this article on how treats injured workers will help explain whyThe author worked at four jobs warehouse worker care worker insurance call center worker and Uber driver The and care worker jobs seemed much worse than either Uber or the call center I took three reasons for this from the bookFirstly the use of zero hour contracts to coerce and intimidate staff and Carewatch UK the care worker agency could simply take work away from staff who complained or wanted to join a union starving them into submissionSecondly and subtle than zero hour contracts comes the calculated diffusion and avoidance of responsibility by the ultimate employer and appallingly if you think about it UK Local Authorities who use agencies to find their staffThese agencies seem truly exploitative They constantly make mistakes which strangely always work in the agencies favor and which I would suspect are really disguised wage theft The agencies also provide legal and reputational cover for and the like who can blame the agencies for anything that goes wrong wash their hands of any accountability towards staff and keep their corporate image that little bit shinierFinally and most controversially is the issue of immigrant labor Many of the locals living near the warehouse are not prepared to take jobs there and good for them The conditions are so bad that most of the jobs are taken by immigrants which is surely how likes it less chance to be taken to a labor tribunal if the injured person s first home is a few thousand miles away and they don t speak the languageThe simple but wrong lesson to take away from this situation is that immigrants are holding down wages for local people It is closer to the truth to say that companies are providing jobs of such low uality and low pay that only people who are extremely poor and easily exploited would ever take themThe call center job is relatively low paid and extremely boring but compared with the company s heart at least seems in the right place Uber driver seems to come out as the best which is not to say that it is good but at least seems to genuinely allow the individual to retain some dignity and flexibilityAs the book explains though the trick with Uber is that the company encourages and drivers to enter the market which encourages competition to keep the market price down and also ensures a good service for Uber customers These actions both go against the interests of the drivers who as a result are forced to spend time cruising around empty while at the same time earning less per tripA second key Uber trick is the blurring of the distinction between being employed and self employment a variation of the avoidance of responsibility concept so loved by large corporations these days Uber gets a pass on employer costs such as paid vacation and it is difficult to hold Uber accountable for the actions of its drivers Uber doesn t employ criminals because we don t employ anyone but we can t guarantee that criminals won t use our app One weakness of the Uber model is the relative lack of network effect that companies like Facebook enjoy Uber has to enter each market each city one by one there aren t many people taking a cab from London to Paris or even from London to BirminghamI wonder if this brings an opportunity for an open source disruption of Uber s business model How satisfying it would be to disrupt the disruptersIf some enterprising programmers could develop an open source alternative to the Uber App then perhaps drivers in a town could use it to start a taxi driver s collective that shared the profits among themselves rather than giving Uber a cut Although the Uber App is good it isn t so advanced compared with other open source programs like StockfishExperiments could be run on an Uber replacement open source app TOW U perhaps Taxi drivers of the World Unite in a localised area to test feasibility and limit the costs of roll out Existing taxi licensing authorities could still license drivers using itDoes anyone else think this is a good idea or is it only me


About the Author: James Bloodworth

James Bloodworth is an English writer and the author of two books The Myth of Meritocracy and Hired Six Months Undercover in Low Wage Britain His work has appeared in the Guardian the Times New York Review of Books New Statesman and elsewhere He is on Twitter as JBloodworth