Melanie Warner [ Ebook ] Pandora's Lunchbox How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal – TXT, Kindle eBook and Epub Read



10 thoughts on “Pandora's Lunchbox How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal

  1. says:

    The trouble with books about food chemistry is they tend to be written by people with agendas and marketed by companies who want bold statements Therefore the plethora of titles out there saying if you eat X YOU ARE GOING TO DIE Everyone can appreciate that in general people are eating and pre prepared food and that also in general this type of food would never be as good as fresh produce and that this rising t

  2. says:

    I got this book because of an interview I heard with the author on NPR I was intrigued about the history of processed food especially howwhere we source a lot of the ingredients that go into our food I was disappointed to see a lot of descriptions along the line of this ingredient is made using which is also present in bad thing which annoyed me because it's a facile argument and sometimes betrays a lack of und

  3. says:

    Not as good as Salt Sugar Fat and not as good as this nytimescom column made me think either I have GOT to stop buying book

  4. says:

    This book provided a fantastic introduction to the world of processed food Some of it was horrifying some of it was humoro

  5. says:

    So another book to torture myself with Considering I spend all my time working reading making sure my kids are fed and on the internet how am I

  6. says:

    If Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma answers How should we eat? Pandora's Lunchbox answers Why should we eat natural foods? Spurred by a blog project in which the author let processed food sit and recorded the unsettling lack of decay this book tracks the historical precedent and health conseuences for preservatives

  7. says:

    I did not expect to read this exact book over Shabbes but I realized on Friday afternoon that it was due back to the library because someone put a hold on it It loooked like a well thumbed copy too which is usually a good signIt was a fascina

  8. says:

    I was all set to read Pultizer Prize winning New York Times reporter Michael Moss's Salt Sugar Fat How the Food Giants Hooked Us when a friend pointed out that this book Pandora's Lunchbox also exists Written by former Fortune and Times staffer Melanie Warner and subtitled How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal Pandora's L

  9. says:

    There's nothing particularly new or startling in this book I guess my feeling is that anyone who didn't know ab

  10. says:

    There's some overlap here with Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss but not as much as you might expect considering that the topic is the same While Moss takes a scrappy journalistic approach Melanie Warner isn't necessarily looking for any dirt She finds it anyway You know the story already if you're even reading this review let alone the book Much of our food is overprocessed overpackaged and filled with fat salt sugar and additives that may or

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Free download ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ì Melanie Warner

E’s Dilemma a fascinating and cutting edge look at. So another book to torture myself with Considering I spend all my time working reading making sure my kids are fed and on the internet how am I ever going to find the time to actually make my own food at home from scratch so I m not killing us all I suppose the gist of the book wasn t really that everything is dangerous but it was icky And it left me with a feeling of desolation that science has mucked with food so much that it s barely even food any and most of it s not even really nutritious regardless of what the marketing says The descriptions of what happens to food before it s packaged for our consumption is mind boggling I m not naive enough to think I can rid myself of processed foods entirely but I m going to make a conscious effort to reduce my reliance on them There was so much information in this book that I m listening to it a second time Edit Second time was just as good as the first Maybe better because it reinforced what I d learned the first time and reminded me of things I heard the first time but maybe forgot or remembered incorrectly Great information

Characters Pandora's Lunchbox How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal

Pandora's Lunchbox How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal

In the tradition of Fast Food Nation and The Omnivor. I got this book because of an interview I heard with the author on NPR I was intrigued about the history of processed food especially howwhere we source a lot of the ingredients that go into our food I was disappointed to see a lot of descriptions along the line of this ingredient is made using which is also present in bad thing which annoyed me because it s a facile argument and sometimes betrays a lack of understanding of science She employs this often enough to make me wonder whether I should believe anything else she writes in this book I didn t have a way of knowing whether the rest of it was as shoddily reported The final chapter was anecdotal and clearly had the intent of scaring the reader into never again eating processed food but it was very clumsily written and had an air of this kid s behavioral problems are ALL BECAUSE OF PROCESSED FOODS SEE Giving the rest of the book a generous reading yielded some interesting nuggets of information For example the history of breakfast cereal how Subway can claim low cal and low fat in their foods how the role of soy has evolved in our food supply that kind of thing I agree with the overall aim of the book we should all strive to eat food that is actually food and a diet composed of too much processed food food that you couldn t make yourself in the kitchen for all the stabilizers chemicals colorings fillers etc should be avoided so I wanted to like it than I did But alas

Free download ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ì Melanie Warner

The scary truth about what really goes into our foo. I did not expect to read this exact book over Shabbes but I realized on Friday afternoon that it was due back to the library because someone put a hold on it It loooked like a well thumbed copy too which is usually a good signIt was a fascinating read though on occasion it did slip into Evil Chemicals I generally eat organic and a lot of the foods she mentioned drew kind of a blank from me not having grown up in the US I think many of these food items are primarily marketed toward children Which is a point she does make and is somewhat terrifying to contemplate But I greatly appreciated her discussion on how even if there are only a few things on the label the actual process of assembling those few ingredients might still be kind of terrible I never thought about that I know about the issues in kosher meat production but there you often buy a chunk of raw meat and not something like breaded saucy etc frozen piecesExamples of Evil Chemicals where I felt this line of thought was a bit excessive comparisons to crude oil and plastics were not always warranted I m perplexed why anyone would be surprised that the synthesis of vitamins is a chemical synthesis with many chemical steps Well of course I did think her discussion on how a vitamin in isolation might not be as helpful was great But I have had a history of multiple vitamin deficiencies probably due to absorption issues and being able to get a large dose of a synthetic vitamin can be LITERALLY a lifesaverI thought her overall conclusion was fine namely that it is probably not terribly unhealthy to eat some processed foods and TV dinners just not constantly and with the exclusion of anything else I thought that she brought many good points to substantiate this in detail She also spoke to many food scientists working on processed foods I was amused that many of these people were diehard organic food eaters in their own lives It reminds me of how both of my parents originally trained as agricultural engineers and worked on big industrial state farms with All the Chemicals and now they both eat organic Surely anecdata but uite tellingI also had some cultural differences moments most notably when the author talked about extrusion as something most people don t know about food when I was a child in Communist Hungary in the 1980s extruded corn was a popular novelty snack and it s freuently eaten in Hungary to this day It s not supposed to have much of a nutritional value though it s just a fun snack So I am genuinely surprised that American parallels to it are sometimes advertised as healthy itemsIt was interesting to see that often the reasoning behind what s healthy is well it could be worse which is a really poor argument as the author correctly points outOverall this was a fun and fascinating book to read One point that made me sad is that many of the factories did not want to let her in whereas when I read Kosher USA I also recommend that book very similar factories let in the author or were in general forthcoming I felt this was both due to a gender difference and also because I m a journalist writing about processed foods sounds like a PR nightmare whereas I m a researcher writing about the history of the kosher food industry sounds like something that could be spun right by a talented PR person from the factories point of view It s definitely not about kashrut itself a lot of store bought kosher food is extremely processed and many of the common American processed foods are kosherNow I want to read about the food industry because this is the second book about the topic that I pick up on impulse in the library and I liked bothSource of the book Lawrence Public Library