[The Lost Art of Scripture read] epub By Karen Armstrong



10 thoughts on “The Lost Art of Scripture

  1. says:

    “In many ways we seem to be losing the art of scripture in the modern world Instead of reading it to achieve transformation we use it to confirm our own views – ether that our religion is right and that of our enemies wrong or in the case of sceptics that religion is unworthy of serious consideration Too many believers and non believers alike now read these sacred texts in a doggedly literal manner that i

  2. says:

    This is a mishmashThe New Testament and uran were routinely revised since ancient times and their message dramatically reinterpreted to meet the needs of the ever present The art of scripture erased the past because the sacred text is known to be the Word of God and it had to conform to the moral rules set in ancient times Hence Muslims are

  3. says:

    This is a remarkable telling of the history of man's desire to commune with his creator how it has been attempted or accomplished from early man to present day with the thread of leftright brain activity This book is filled with historical information from the world's varied cultures and faithsWhether you are a

  4. says:

    Karen Armstrong is a profound thinker writer and historian I felt like I understood about half of what she wrote but that half was really worth the long read My sense of her thesis is that to rescue the sacred texts we need to read them aloud and repeatedly bringing them to bear on our present day histories This far of a right brain transformative experience than a left brain academic one

  5. says:

    Perhaps the most conspicuous thing about Karen Armstrong's new book The Lost Art of Scripture is that it is about twice as long as it needs to be This is not really surprising Most books are twice as long as they need to be But this one is really really twice as long as it needs to be If an editor had reuired her to cut 50% of it before publication it would have been a much stronger bookAnd this does not mean that it is a weak book It is

  6. says:

    I arrived here after watching Karen Armstrong talking about scripture on TV on how its modern narrow and often misguided interpretation needs to be understood and redressed Certainly the first few pages set up this argument but then the text seems to veer off on a tangent leaving that very argument behind and losing its grip on a clear and solid interpretation There is some talk or neuroscience but this comes down to

  7. says:

    A lot of knowledge of the material here but I felt like Armstrong bit off than she could chew You get an overview of theology and scripture from China India and the West going back 4000 years The start of the book introduces the book's main point how we've come to a point where we don't do a good job reading scripture We go to scripture to confirm what we already think not to learn from it But that point gets l

  8. says:

    Karen Armstrong for those unfamiliar with her work is a former nun and British writer who has written extensively on religion and religious themes I've read and learned a lot from a few of her many books including A History of God to which this current book seems almost a seuel Armstrong who is 75 is now an ambassador for the United Nations A

  9. says:

    Karen Armstong is recognized as one of the most respected religious scholars alive today She has a remarkable range of knowledge about the history of various religions including China India Judaism Christianity and IslamShe argues in this book

  10. says:

    It is always a pleasure to read Karen Armstrong her clear prose and balance between scholarship and general inter

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characters ê PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Karen Armstrong

In our increasingly secular world holy texts are at best seen as irrelevant and at worst as an excuse to incite violence hatred and division So what value if any can scripture hold for us today And if our world no longer seems compatible with scripture is it perhaps because its original purpose has become lostToday we see the uran being used by some to justify war and terrorism the Torah to deny Palestinians the right to live in the Land of Israel and the Bible to condemn homosexuality and contraception The holy texts at the. This is a remarkable telling of the history of man s desire to commune with his creator how it has been attempted or accomplished from early man to present day with the thread of leftright brain activity This book is filled with historical information from the world s varied cultures and faithsWhether you are a scholar of any of the world s sacred texts or familiar with the history of worship in all its forms in varying cultures this book has applications for todayHighly recommend to anyone interested in the study of worship through the agesLibrary Loan

Free download The Lost Art of Scripture

The Lost Art of Scripture

To transcend their physical existence and to experience a higher level of consciousness Holy texts were seen as fluid and adaptable rather than a set of binding archaic rules or a ‘truth’ that has to be ‘believed’Armstrong argues that only by rediscovering an open engagement with their holy texts will the world’s religions be able to curtail arrogance intolerance and violence And if scripture is used to engage with the world in meaningful and compassionate ways we will find that it still has a great deal to teach u. A lot of knowledge of the material here but I felt like Armstrong bit off than she could chew You get an overview of theology and scripture from China India and the West going back 4000 years The start of the book introduces the book s main point how we ve come to a point where we don t do a good job reading scripture We go to scripture to confirm what we already think not to learn from it But that point gets lost in the mass of info The last chapter takes the idea head on but it barely mentions China or India in doing so It s two books in one a history of religion and an intepretation of modern theology but the two parts never uite come together

characters ê PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Karen Armstrong

Centre of all religious traditions are often employed selectively to underwrite arbitrary and subjective views They are believed to be divinely ordained; they are claimed to contain eternal truthsBut as Karen Armstrong a world authority on religious affairs shows in this fascinating journey through millennia of history this narrow reading of scripture is a relatively recent phenomenon For hundreds of years these texts were instead viewed as spiritual tools scripture was a means for the individual to connect with the divine. Perhaps the most conspicuous thing about Karen Armstrong s new book The Lost Art of Scripture is that it is about twice as long as it needs to be This is not really surprising Most books are twice as long as they need to be But this one is really really twice as long as it needs to be If an editor had reuired her to cut 50% of it before publication it would have been a much stronger bookAnd this does not mean that it is a weak book It is not It has a strong and compelling thesis and a lot of relevant support for the thesis but it has a lot if irrelevant support for the thesis too and that is why it is twice as long as it needs to beArmstrong s primary argument if I understand it correctly is that scripture is like poetry drama or teen paranormal romance a specific art form I would be tempted to say genre with expectations conventions and assumptions Among the most important of these assumptions are 1 scriptures are a way to approach a true and ultimate reality 2 scriptures are designed to help people connect with said TaUR within specific historical and cultural contexts and 3 scriptures are normally part of a whole package that includes myths and rituals and liturgies and other stuff that helps people connect with the divine and perhaps most importantly scriptures are never done and canons are never closed because while the true and ultimate reality never changes historical and cultural realities are constantly shifting so the way to contact the one to the other must change to Scriptures in other words must always be updated and made relevant to new contexts Canons are always evolving We should never close the book and say no But she suggests most Western religions have done just that They have locked in a certain culture s ways of connecting to true and ultimate reality Iron age Levantine culture say or Early Roman Empire or Arabian Peninsuala tribal culture Because this is the context of the books we consider sacred we have locked in something that should be fluid and created unchanging idols where there should be works in progress I am uite sympathetic to this argument and would like to have seen it made and supported as an argument But that is not uite what Armstrong does Rather she spends most of the book looking at the development of religion in the Ancient Near East the Indus Valley and the Chinese Empire A lot of this information is fascinating and by the end of the book the reader will have a good idea of how each major region produced a line of religions with sacred texts In China Confucianism lead to Mohism Taoism Legalism and Neo Confucianism each with its own sets of sacred texts In India it was Vedic Hinduism Upanishadic Hinduism Buddhism Jainism and Sikhism And in Mesopotamia it was Judaism Christianity and Islam each of which went through classical mystical and Enlightenment phasesThe problem is that this is either way too much for a book making an argument about the genre conventions of the scriptures and not nearly enough for a comprehensive survey of all of the world s major religions And instead of focusing on the former she often wanders off into general descriptions of the religions themselves that are too fragmented and too cursory to do justice to any of them The result I think is a book that spends too little time doing what it should be doing and way too much time doing other things that it doesn t do very wellAll of that said though I do agree with Armstrong s thesis about the art of scripture and how we lost it And I find enugh support for this assertion in the book to make it a valuable way to think about sacred texts